Celiac DiseaseInfo Center

Good Cancer News for Celiac Patients

A gluten-free diet can control or eliminate the painful symptoms of celiac disease. Now, there is more good news for celiac disease patients, especially the ones who eat gluten-free.

Quinoa for a Gluten-Free Diet

Quinoa is a high-protein grain from South America that has become more popular in recent years. A recent study examined whether people who could not eat gluten could tolerate this grain.

How Do Celiac and Autism Intersect?

Research on autism spectrum disorders has uncovered more and more information each year. One area that has often been studied is the relationship between autism and digestive problems.

Gut Feeling About Cancer

In patients with celiac disease, the immune system attacks the patient's own body and causes damage to the lining of the gut. The disease has been linked to a higher risk of lymphoma, a type of blood cancer.

Celiac's Focus on the Family

While families can pass down a lot of things from one generation to the next, one thing that unfortunately gets caught in the mix is celiac disease.

Celiac Prevention for Babies

Parents often wonder when to feed new foods to their baby. New research suggests that introducing wheat early can help babies avoid developing celiac disease.

Celiac: It's in the Intestines

Just because children may eat their vegetables doesn't mean they're always healthy. If kids have celiac disease, they may not be properly digesting their nutrients. And how their intestines stretch out may help tell whether the disease is to blame.

From Stomach Aches to Headaches

When the stomach's yearning for food, heads can start aching as well. And it can happen more often among people with stomach problems.

Eye Damage in Type 1 Plus Celiac

Celiac disease (a condition that damages the small intestine) may boost the risk of type 1 diabetes. But that may not be where the damage ends. Celiac disease could lead to problems down the road for diabetes patients.

Defining Wheat Sensitivity

Wheat sensitivity may show up as nausea or in bowel problems. A recent study found that some people with wheat sensitivity had symptoms more like celiac disease, while others had symptoms more like a food allergy.