Eating Disorders Health Center

If someone you know is showing signs of anorexia, you may be able to help.

  • Set a time to talk. Set aside a time to talk privately with your friend. Make sure you talk in a quiet place where you won’t be distracted.
  • Tell your friend about your concerns. Be honest. Tell your friend about your worries about her or his not eating or over exercising. Tell your friend you are concerned and that you think these things may be a sign of a problem that needs professional help.
  • Ask your friend to talk to a professional. Your friend can talk to a counselor or doctor who knows about eating issues. Offer to help your friend find a counselor or doctor and make an appointment, and offer to go with her or him to the appointment.
  • Avoid conflicts. If your friend won’t admit that she or he has a problem, don’t push. Be sure to tell your friend you are always there to listen if she or he wants to talk.
  • Don’t place shame, blame, or guilt on your friend. Don’t say, “You just need to eat.” Instead, say things like, “I’m concerned about you because you won’t eat breakfast or lunch.” Or, “It makes me afraid to hear you throwing up.”
  • Don’t give simple solutions. Don’t say, "If you'd just stop, then things would be fine!"
  • Let your friend know that you will always be there no matter what.

Rate This Article

3.078845
Review Date: 
March 13, 2012
Last Updated:
August 8, 2014
Source:
dailyrx.com