Testicular CancerInfo Center

Slight Rise in Testicular Cancer among Young Hispanic Americans

One sector of young American males is seeing more testicular cancer now than ever, and experts don’t know why.

Seeing Through the Medical Radiation Risk Story

Imagine if you had a cancer that needed to be treated right away. The doctor orders CT scans. Would the fact that radiation exposure from the tests increases your lifetime cancer risks keep you from having the scans?

Buzz Kill: Marijuana Use Linked To Testicular Cancer

Cancer of the testis can and does appear in teenage boys as young as 14. The incidence of this cancer is rising, and some experts think there may be environmental links.

Marriage Matters for Men

Earlier research has suggested that a man's marital status impacts how well he deals with many items, including testicular cancer. A man's marital status may be an indicator of how long he will live after treatment for the most common malignancy found in young men.

Confirming Cancer Treatment Standards

The most common cancer in young men affects the testis. These are called germ cell tumors or GCTs. The guidelines for treating advanced (cancer that has spread or metastasized) cases have recently been studied.

Sex After Testicular Cancer Has Challenges

Testicular cancer usually strikes young men in their 20s and 30s. It's the most common cancer in this age group and also the most curable. Researchers wanted to know how the cancer and its treatment affect sexual function.

Cancer Champion Turned Olympian

Cancer almost kept Jake Gibb from going for the gold in London. He was diagnosed with testicular cancer in December, 2010 - just as the Olympic qualifying period was beginning. 

Radiation and Unborn Baby Boys

Increasingly, we're learning that exposure to radiation from X-rays and other medical tests can have long-term health consequences. A recent study shows that unborn baby male mice are vulnerable.

Poorer Men More Likely to Die of Testicular Cancer

When caught early, testicular cancer has one of the highest survival rates - nearly 100 percent with the right treatment. But what are the factors relating to diagnosis and long-term survival? New research uncovers disparities.

"The Lance Armstrong Effect"

Why do 70 out of a 100 men with testicular cancer beat the disease, while only 6 in 100 people with pancreatic cancer live five years after diagnosis? Researchers have a new theory that could impact how all cancers are treated.