ED Rx For Treating Sexual Issues

Erectile dysfunction treatment medication tadalafil also improved ejaculation and ability to orgasm

February 16, 2013 / Author:  / Reviewed by: Joseph V. Madia, MD

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(dailyRx News) Erectile dysfunction (ED) affects about 30 million men in the United States. Even if men don't have ED, they can still have sexual problems. And they may be reluctant to seek treatment for sex problems until they experience ED.

A recent study found that men with ED who took tadalafil had significant improvements in ability to ejaculate and have an orgasm compared to those not taking the medication.  Overall sexual satisfaction was also improved in men with ED taking tadalafil. 

"Talk to a doctor about treatment options for your ED"

ED is the inability to get or keep an erection during sex. ED is treatable. One type of medication, tadalafil (sold under the brand name Cialis), increases blood flow to the penis and helps with erections. 

Men can also have other sexual issues, including problems with ejaculation and reaching orgasm. These issues may occur with or without ED. Treatment options for sexual problems could be similar to ED treatments. 

Darius Paduch, MD, of Department of Urology and Reproductive Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College, and colleagues led the study to measure the effects of tadalafil on the ability to ejaculate and orgasm in patients with ED. 

The researchers reviewed data from 17 placebo-controlled 12-week trials of tadalafil that ED participants took as needed. Dosages of tadalafil were 5, 10 and 20 mg. 

A total of 3,581 participants were included in the trials and were randomly assigned to receive tadalafil or a placebo (fake pill). Difficulty with ejaculation, orgasm difficulties and overall sexual satisfaction were measured using questionnaires. 

Results showed that 66 percent of men with severe ejaculation problems reported improvement after using tadalafil, compared to 36 percent in the placebo group. Among men with severe orgasm difficulties, 66 percent of men taking tadalafil reported improvement versus 35 percent of the placebo group. 

Researchers said that men taking tadalafil had improvements in ejaculation and ability to orgasm regardless of the severity of their ED when they started the medication. Overall sexual satisfaction decreased when the trials ended and the men stopped taking tadalafil.  

There were some limitations to the study. This review may have underestimated the degrees of ejaculation and orgasm dysfunction because all of the patients had ED. Men who have problems with ejaculation or orgasms may not seek treatment until they have ED. Researchers suggested future studies should include trials for men with and without ED to measure tadalafil's affects on sexual functioning.  

This study, titled "Effects of tadalafil treatment on ejaculatory and orgasmic dysfunction and sexual satisfaction in patients with mild to severe erectile dysfunction: integrated analysis of 17 placebo-controlled studies," was published in BJU International. It was funded by Eli Lilly and Company. Two of the authors are paid investigators and consultants for Eli Lilly. The other two authors are employees and minor shareholders in Eli Lilly, maker of tadalafil.